Chronic Wasting Disease Confirmed in Captive Cervid Herd

The Kansas Department of Agriculture has confirmed a case of Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) in a captive cervid herd in Osage County, Kansas, and is working with the Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism to mitigate risk to the captive cervid industry as well as the local wild deer population in the area.

The Kansas Department of Agriculture has confirmed a case of Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) in a captive cervid herd in Osage County, Kansas, and is working with the Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism to mitigate risk to the captive cervid industry as well as the local wild deer population in the area. Though CWD has been detected in wild deer populations in many western Kansas counties, this is the first documented positive case in eastern Kansas and the first in a captive herd since 2001.

CWD is an infectious, degenerative disease of animals in the family cervidae (elk, deer, and moose) that impacts the animal’s brain cells, ultimately causing death. Only animals in the family cervidae are susceptible to CWD. Currently, there is no evidence that CWD poses a threat to humans.

The CWD-infected animal was born and raised on the premises in Osage County where it was tested after being euthanized in late June. The affected premises has been placed under quarantine, and tracing and surveillance are underway on all animals which have moved into or out of this captive cervid herd in the last five years.

KDWPT will conduct additional surveillance of CWD in Osage County as part of the agency’s annual testing of wild deer taken during hunting seasons, and through a three-year, statewide research project set to begin this fall. KDWPT will use the data collected to develop CWD risk assessment maps and future surveillance, prevention, management, and regulatory efforts.

Owners of captive cervid herds in Kansas are encouraged to participate in KDA’s CWD Herd Certification Program. This program provides increased oversight via annual inventory reconciliation, identification of all cervids over one year of age on the premises, and CWD testing for all animal mortalities. Though certification is voluntary, only operations that have been CWD-certified for at least five years may legally move animals interstate. The infected Osage County animal was in a CWD-certified herd which had not received any animals from any operations that did not have equal or greater certification status.

For more information, visit www.agriculture.ks.gov/CWD, call the KDA Division of Animal Health at 785-564-6601, or visit KDWPT at ksoutdoors.com/CWD.

The Kansas Department of Agriculture is dedicated to serving Kansas farmers, ranchers, agribusinesses and the consumers/customers they serve while also promoting public health and safety, protecting animal health, and providing consumer protection to the best of our ability.

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